Local dating in wiltshire


The University of Buckingham's Humanities Research Institute believes that the community who built Stonehenge lived here over a period of several millennia, making it potentially "one of the pivotal places in the history of the Stonehenge landscape." The first monument consisted of a circular bank and ditch enclosure made of Late Cretaceous (Santonian Age) Seaford Chalk, measuring about 110 metres (360 ft) in diameter, with a large entrance to the north east and a smaller one to the south.It stood in open grassland on a slightly sloping spot.The surrounding circular earth bank and ditch, which constitute the earliest phase of the monument, have been dated to about 3100 BC.Radiocarbon dating suggests that the first bluestones were raised between 24 BC, It has been a legally protected Scheduled Ancient Monument since 1882 when legislation to protect historic monuments was first successfully introduced in Britain.



Salisbury Plain was then still wooded, but 4,000 years later, during the earlier Neolithic, people built a causewayed enclosure at Robin Hood's Ball and long barrow tombs in the surrounding landscape.Because its bank is inside its ditch, Stonehenge is not truly a henge site. Stones visible today are shown coloured Mike Parker Pearson, leader of the Stonehenge Riverside Project based at Durrington Walls, noted that Stonehenge appears to have been associated with burial from the earliest period of its existence: Stonehenge was a place of burial from its beginning to its zenith in the mid third millennium B. The cremation burial dating to Stonehenge's sarsen stones phase is likely just one of many from this later period of the monument's use and demonstrates that it was still very much a domain of the dead.Despite being contemporary with true Neolithic henges and stone circles, Stonehenge is in many ways atypical—for example, at more than 7.3 metres (24 ft) tall, its extant trilithons' lintels, held in place with mortise and tenon joints, make it unique. Stonehenge evolved in several construction phases spanning at least 1500 years.This first stage is dated to around 3100 BC, after which the ditch began to silt up naturally.

Within the outer edge of the enclosed area is a circle of 56 pits, each about a metre (3 ft 3 in) in diameter, known as the Aubrey holes after John Aubrey, the seventeenth-century antiquarian who was thought to have first identified them.

The ditch was continuous but had been dug in sections, like the ditches of the earlier causewayed enclosures in the area.