Dating meissen marks


As a further precaution, very few workers knew the special secret (arcanum) of how to make porcelain, and then perhaps only part of the process. Variations in the logo allow approximate dating of the wares.Thus, for a few years, Meissen retained its monopoly on the production of hard-paste porcelain in Europe. But, in the 18th century, the mark was not considered important, and placed on the back of figurines and back side of plates in a crude manor.In 1720 Johann Gregorius Höroldt became the director and introduced brilliant colours which made Meissen porcelain famous.



When Tschirnhaus suddenly died, the recipe apparently was handed over to Böttger, who within one week announced to the King that he could make porcelain.Its signature logo, the crossed swords, was introduced in 1720 to protect its production; the mark of the crossed swords is one of the oldest trademarks in existence.It dominated the style of European porcelain until 1756.At the beginning of the eighteenth century Johann Friedrich Böttger pretended he had solved the dream of the alchemists, to produce gold from worthless materials.