Algieria sex


According to the official Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) report (2010), there are various government micro-credit schemes that particularly target women.In her report, the Special Rapporteur noted that women living alone are sometimes the targets of hostility and even violence, while a report by Freedom House notes that divorced or single women who move within Algeria for work often face accusations that they are engaging in ‘immoral’ behaviour.The penal code allows for more severe penalties when violence is perpetrated against children or against parents, but does not consider violence committed by a spouse as an aggravating factor.According to the 2010 Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) report, legal provisions relating specifically to domestic violence and other forms of violence against women were at that stage being drafted.However, as the Special Rapporteur notes, sexual harassment remains largely underreported, with only 99 cases registered by the judicial police throughout the country from January to October 2010.According to the Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women (who visited Algeria in 2010), sexual harassment remains largely underreported, due to fear among victims of reprisals and counter-accusations, and the lack of protection afforded to victims and witnesses in sexual harassment cases.



According to the new Family Code, women cannot marry without the consent of their guardians (who are always male), however guardians cannot force a woman to marry against her will, or oppose a marriage.Launched in 2006, the government’s Rural Renewal Policy – designed to revitalise rural areas and boost sustainable development – appears to be gender blind, and does not specifically target or support rural women.However, as of 2008, the official Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) report (2010) notes that 3,550 women (out of a total of 101,838) had been assisted to purchase land through a state ‘farmland ownership productivity enhancement programme’.Women bore the brunt of violence and abuse during Algeria’s civil war, which lasted from 1991 to 2002.

Rape, torture, forced marriage and pregnancy and murder, for the most part by armed rebel groups, were commonplace, although it is impossible to say with any certainty how many women were affected.

A National Strategy to Combat Violence Against Women was in place for 2007-2011, with the aim of raising awareness about gender-based violence, and putting systems in place to provide support to women who have been affected.